WW2 German Bunkers

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Peter
#1
This may be in the wrong category but there is no sub-section for buildings which is why I have put it in weapons - after all many bunkers had guns!

In the picture quite thread I mentioned the clever chimney design. the obvious danger of a chimney is the risk of somebody dropping an hand grenade to the like down it, into the bunker. the Germans had a clever design to combat this:

Stove Detail.JPG
As the sectional elevation shows, anything dropped down would fall harmlessly outside the bunker often into the escape shaft where it would fall on sand/gravel and do no damage.

In answer to Jakko's question about which type of bunker had periscopes: in Guernsey at least the majority of 'front line' Fortress standard bunkers had them. These would include: the personnel bunker which is being converted into a house (see earlier thread), casemates housing 10.5cm K331(f), Casemates housing 4.7cm Pak 36(t), M19 automatic Mortar bunkers.

This link may be of interest - it is to the Festung Guernsey website. this is a group dedicated to restoring German fortifications:

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For anybody who is interested in German defences of WW2 this link may be of interest:

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The Commanding Officer of the German garrison, Lieutenant-General Graf von Schmettow commissioned a work which recorded details of the Island's history and fortifications. Completed in 1944 it is a unique document, in effect a combination of operating manual, articles and instructions, combined with hundreds of photographs, hand painted maps and beautifully crafted watercolour panoramas of the coastline. It also includes details of the armaments and personnel at each location as well as each location's tactical purpose.

I am not linked in anyway to this publisher.

Peter
 

minitnkr

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#2
All the ones I saw in the Verdun complex had metal rain caps and were in large beds of tangle foot barbed wire secured w/iron stakes. Very nasty stuff still, after all these years. Excellent drawings & refs. Peter. There is a building subsection under Dioramas I think. PaulE
 

Mickc1440

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I remember watching a build on grand designs when someone took on a bunker in this country. The specialists needed to alter the buildings loved it :smiling2::smiling2::smiling2::smiling2: they were not designed to be messed with!!!
 

Jakko

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As the sectional elevation shows, anything dropped down would fall harmlessly outside the bunker often into the escape shaft where it would fall on sand/gravel and do no damage.
I couldn’t find a drawing online of the ventilation system I mentioned in response to your post about the chimney, and looking through some of my books I still can’t :sad: I’m almost certain I have a drawing of it somewhere …

In answer to Jakko's question about which type of bunker had periscopes: in Guernsey at least the majority of 'front line' Fortress standard bunkers had them.
On Walcheren, I get the impression only the heavier types of machine gun bunker etc. had them. The Regelbau 502 museum bunker where I live doesn’t even have the opening in the roof for it, for example.

M19 automatic Mortar bunkers.
However, I did find one of that last weapon, so I thought I’d scan it and post it here, for those who wonder how a mortar was mounted in a bunker:

M19 automatic mortar.jpeg

And the steel cupola being emplaced:

M19 automatic mortar 1.jpeg


This link may be of interest - it is to the Festung Guernsey website. this is a group dedicated to restoring German fortifications
I’ll definitely check that site out. Let me share the site of a similar organisation around my part of the world:
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(the English version of the site isn’t great, that front page especially, but use the menu at the top to explore).
 
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Peter
#5
Jakko

Thanks for the link, I will check it out later.

That is a great photo of the 'bell' housing being installed. Unfortunately in Guernsey there was a scrap metal drive in the late 1940's when a lot of the metal in bunkers was taken for scrap. This involved parts as small as ventialtion pipes up to the metal M19 housings and the massive 30cm Mirus battery.

The Festung Guernsey guys are renovating and re-installing a M19 mortar. The compromise they made was to rebuild the 'bell' housing out of concrete rather than steel.

Peter
 

Jakko

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That is a great photo of the 'bell' housing being installed.
It was on the next page to the drawing in the book I scanned it from, Atlantikwall in Zeeland en Vlaanderen gedurende opbouw en strijd 1942-1944 (“Atlantikwall in Zeeland and Flanders during construction and combat 1942-1944”) by H. Sakkers and J.N. Houterman, Middelburg: H. Sakkers, 1990, ISBN 90-9003302-5. This is a pretty detailed account of exactly what the title says, with all sorts of pictures of bunkers under construction, bunker plans, various original technical drawings, and a detailed text about all of this.

Unfortunately in Guernsey there was a scrap metal drive in the late 1940's when a lot of the metal in bunkers was taken for scrap. This involved parts as small as ventialtion pipes up to the metal M19 housings and the massive 30cm Mirus battery.
Much the same on Walcheren, though in most of the bunkers I’ve been in, they only took what was easily removed. Entry gates, blast doors, etc. were nearly all gone in all the bunkers, though one we used to play in as children still had its gates and doors, wedged half open by at least half a meter of sand and then rusted in place. In one I visited about fifteen years ago, I remember the steel doorframes also being gone, but the one right next to it still had those.

The Festung Guernsey guys are renovating and re-installing a M19 mortar. The compromise they made was to rebuild the 'bell' housing out of concrete rather than steel.
There’s (apparently — I’ve never been to it) an M19 bunker in Vlissingen, still pretty much intact, a Regelbau 633 like this:

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