54mm Charge of the Scots Greys

papa 695

Moderator
Staff member
Moderator
SMF Supporter
Joined
May 9, 2011
Messages
15,986
Points
113
First Name
Ian
I’d be completely over the moon if I had half the skills you have. Fantastic work, loving watching this build Neil.
 

Neil Merryweather

SMF Supporter
Joined
Dec 29, 2018
Messages
1,475
Points
113
Location
London
First Name
Neil
Thanks Wouter.
I have always had a soft spot for these figures since they came out in the seventies, when I was a lad.
And this project is a long-held ambition, so I guess it's a labour of love....
There's just that bl88dy tartan to face now!
 

scottie3158

SMF Supporter
Joined
Apr 27, 2018
Messages
5,828
Points
113
First Name
Paul
Neil,
Excellent work mate the hand looks great did you roll little sausages for individual fingers or did you form them from one block?
 

Neil Merryweather

SMF Supporter
Joined
Dec 29, 2018
Messages
1,475
Points
113
Location
London
First Name
Neil
Neil,
Excellent work mate the hand looks great did you roll little sausages for individual fingers or did you form them from one block?
:smiling5:
cheers Scottie.
Just a single blob, get it roughly to shape, let it cure for half an hour then finish off with a scalpel.
I use silicon Clay Shapers for most of the work because they don't stick too much to the Duro
 

Wouter

SMF Supporter
Joined
Apr 28, 2018
Messages
647
Points
93
Location
Belgium
First Name
Wouter
I use those silocone shapers too, awesome stuff. I must say I find that green stuff to be quite sticky though, especially in comparison to other putties like Magic Sculp. I have a Mike Blank book somewhere where he mentions that you can mix green stuff and MS, looking forward to try that. Always impressed to see how people can get around working with green stuff.

Cheers
 

Neil Merryweather

SMF Supporter
Joined
Dec 29, 2018
Messages
1,475
Points
113
Location
London
First Name
Neil
Well, I’ve bitten the bullet and had a go at the tartan- on a test piece, not the real thing.
So for the beginners or timid (i.e. those one step behind me) here is my blow-by-blow account of the misery, mostly stolen from Bill Horan’s Military Modelling Masterclass.
The difference is he uses Humbrol and I’ve used acrylics.
Please understand I am not setting myself up as any kind of expert-far from it- this is just what I did and how it turned out at first attempt, warts and all.
I used a wet palette, which I have only just discovered after over a year of struggling with acrylics, and it has revolutionised my painting experience. What’s annoying is that I had it about 9 months before I started to use it, because I thought it was only for serious painting, and I wasn’t really doing that. Doh!
IMG_20200627_122855900.jpg
Now when I got it I was a bit shocked at how much I had paid for what is basically a Lock’n’Seal box with a bit of foam and a bit of felt and a sheet of greaseproof paper, and if I ever need another one I will certainly do it myself, but it’s done, put it down to experience…..
IMG_20200629_164911730_HDR.jpg
But it DOES work, in that it keeps your paint workable as long as you need it-even for a couple of days.

Anyway, I used the original kilt from the Highlander kit, which helpfully has lines scribed in it. I started with Prussian Blue, which needed 2 coats. I gave it basic shades and highlights, in the hope that they will ‘pre-shade’ the pattern as it builds up.
K1.jpg
I then painted the main stripes with Black Green- slightly thinned in the hope that the shading will show through.
K2.jpg
I mixed some yellow into the Black Green for the crossover squares
K3.jpg
I tried a few variations of the mix.
Next came lines in a very thin filter of black, either side of the green lines.
K4.jpg
I thought the contrast was a bit strong, so I added a filter of Prussian Blue over half the kilt, to see if it helped.
K5.jpg
I think so. So far, so straightforward……..if a little bit intense.
Next came the yellow lines, again, quite thin so as to show the various colours underneath, And that’s when I developed the shakes………….
K6.jpg
I added a stronger yellow dot at the crossovers, just for the hell of it, but the damage was done.
As I said- warts and all!

Not perfect by any stretch of the imagination, but I think it’s a reasonable first attempt- and it does look better with the naked eye rather than the optivisor or the digital screen! So I will have another couple of attempts and hopefully it will turn out ok.
I’ve just thought, if I varnish before I do the yellow stripes I can have several bites of the cherry if necessary. I’ve also definitely decided to remove the kilt from the model and work on it separately, both to avoid doing damage to the rest of him and in order to make access as easy as possible.
So there we are, one step nearer to slaying the demon!
Thanks for looking

Neil
 

Mini Me

SMF Supporter
Joined
Jun 1, 2018
Messages
3,008
Points
113
First Name
Rick
I would try to follow the contours and folds in the kilt a bit more as I think it might look a bit more natural....it just appears a little stiff to my but I'm no expert.....not even a novice for that matter. Rick H.
 

Neil Merryweather

SMF Supporter
Joined
Dec 29, 2018
Messages
1,475
Points
113
Location
London
First Name
Neil
I would try to follow the contours and folds in the kilt a bit more as I think it might look a bit more natural....it just appears a little stiff to my but I'm no expert.....not even a novice for that matter. Rick H.
You're absolutely right, Rick, but for this exercise I was simply following the scribed lines on the model kilt, just to see if I could even do it! The lines are actually wrong in that thy fan out from the waist at the front, when they should be absolutely straight.the kilt only gets its shape from the pleating around the sides and back, which is going to be a considerable challenge, and mine has a great big fold in his lap, front and centre, which I will need to get spot on.
Luckily no-one will be watching......
 

Wouter

SMF Supporter
Joined
Apr 28, 2018
Messages
647
Points
93
Location
Belgium
First Name
Wouter
glad you are showing this mate. Those thin lines and shakes, I know all about the feeling. Don't understand how certain figure painting aces do those tidy lines. Looking forward to see you slay that demon though! Keep on going ^^

Cheers
 

wotan

SMF Supporter
Joined
May 16, 2018
Messages
452
Points
93
First Name
John
Neil

very nice job so far. I got a tip once to paint thin stripes. paint in all the background stuff first then apply a gloss varnish over it. Then using an oil based paint, either an enamel or oil paints, paint in the thin stipes using a thinned version of the yellow in this case. Then since the surface is varnished and the paint will remain wet for a little while you can use a dry brush to refine the thin stripes to remove any blotches or shaky hand wiggles by running the brush carefully along the sides of the stripe. I can't say I have tried it but the technique sounds viable.

John
 

Steve Jones

SMF Supporter
Joined
Apr 27, 2018
Messages
5,039
Points
113
Location
Plymouth
First Name
Steve
A brilliant first attempt Neil. You certainly need to have a steady hand for this sort of work
 
Top