A Face Painting Tutorial

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Hi chaps - glad this is working out.

Thanks Gary. I can do all that but can't seem to copy the re-formatted sizes to this site.

Anyway, I'm calling the face done:

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The hair was blocked in with black brown, then the highlights picked up by dragging the brush, lightly loaded with English uniform, across the grain to catch the highlights The shadows were re-drawn, then highlights added.

The final stages were about cleaning up, making sure that the detail was defined and adding some extra bits, like highlights to the lips etc.

I'm quite pleased with the way it has turned out, especially after anticipating more problems than actually arose. The sculpt is quite wonky, but I don't think it matters here - all part of the character.

I'll carry on with the SBS if I may, demonstrating how I go about painting the clothing and equipment.
 

Jim R

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Hi Peter
Very nice indeed. Especially as you were having to photograph this SBS.
Jim
 

scottie3158

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Peter,
Thank you very much for taking the time to do this SBS as usual your work is superb. I will try this method the next time I try to do justice to a figure.
 
D

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My pleasure people. I'm pleased that my humble efforts are to your liking.

Steve - That's bloomin' amazing! Thank you so much. I'd have tried harder if I knew that was going to happen. I will carry on with this and do the hat and torso if you're interested.

Had some thoughts on finish, namely why don't I take it further and attempt super-detailing - individual spots of stubble etc etc? I think the basic reason is that I simply don't enjoy doing that sort of thing and prefer a relatively painterly look. ie that gives an impression of complexion, expression etc.
 

Peter Gillson

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Peter

Thanks for taking the time to do this SBS - really interesting.

Peter
 
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Brilliant Peter, thank you :smiling4:
Now if I’m honest, I was pretty sure you where using a magic wand all this time :smiling5:!
This puts a whole new perspective on figures for me...can’t wait to have a go now.

Thanks again Peter:thumb2:
 

Ian M

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Will do Ian.

The only trouble is that I find the full size a bit too big and can't seem to edit and format my own pictures. Any tips?
Does the upload not resize them automatically any more?
 
D

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Si - Hope you can use it. Thanks for looking in.

Ian -No, I don't think it does. Things changed when I got a new computer a year ago and lost the formatting tool I'd been using. The only option I can transfer comes out full page. I was worried here that as there would be so many pictures the thread would run to several pages if I had to post them all full size.
 

John Race

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Thank you Peter, now we just need to apply the wisdom, and what a treat to be able to print off Steve's adobe file. Thanks Steve.
John.
 

wotan

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Peter

Bravo for putting this together. I know it's not easy to stop to photograph the work every 15 minutes or so.
I also agree very much with your appreciation of early portraiture using the grisaile technique. I like to do the same thing when I am painting. By chance I was just working on a copy of one of my favorite portrait painters Hans Holbein the younger. These photos show how useful the grisaile technique is. Of course you can use any colour for the underpainting but the important thing is you are working in monotone so you have much less to think about in the first stages. You only need to consider form and tone and this helps simplify the initial painting process. As a second stage you can add as many coloured glazes as you want, knowing that the basic form is already there. This is an example of what I have been working on in oils.

333470

I see our techniques are very similar even if this is 2D in oils and yours is 3D in acrylic.

John
 

SteveH

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Morning Peter

A massive thank you for sharing and apologies for my tardy reply.

My reduced hours return to work has still been overwhelming this week
Today its off to help my son with new apartment DIY, then hopefully some R&R and figure painting over the longer weekend.
I shall share your SBS with a work colleague, after showing him the 4 superb busts, I am proud to own, he wanted to know more about the artist.

Very well done too Peter, I know from dim and distant memory, when you get in the painting "zone", its difficult to keep breaking out to take photos

Have a good day with the paints

Regards

Steve H
 
D

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John R - A pleasure. I'll do the uniform next.

John B - I thought that was an original Holbein at first. Pretty amazing work there. I know you admire the Flemish renaissance masters, Van der Weyden, Campin, Van Eyck etc, as do I. To think that until fairly recently they used to be known as the 'Northern Primitives'! I can't claim to use their techniques, but I have been influenced by their, and the Italian's colouring.

Steve - I would have thought DIY at your son's was the last thing you needed! Sounds that you've just about survived your first week back though - well done. Don't show the SBS to too many people -I'd hate to be responsible for spreading bad habits. My style isn't popular everywhere, particularly on PF where some consider it 'cartoonish'.
 

Andy Belsey

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Peter,
You'll have noticed that I've taken the lazy option just to 'like' this, but I thought I should make the effort to actually say THANK YOU for going to all the effort of putting this together for us. Very helpful!
Andy
 
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Peter
I was taking the lazy option as well but Andrew has put the pressure on so thank you very much.
I've already filed the PDF, thank you Steve.
 
D

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Andy and Randall - Many thanks, though a like is more than enough. Greatly appreciated.

On to the uniform.

The palette:

100_4262.JPG

This is the complete palette for the rest of the figure. All Vallejo Model Colour. From top left:

1. German Camo Black Brown; 2. Red Leather; 3. Off White; 4. Stone Grey; 5. Flat Flesh; 6. English Uniform; 7. Old Gold; 8.Brass; 9. Bronze.

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I noticed that in the photo the shirt appears darker than the tunic so I painted it with English uniform over a base of black brown, with flat flesh added for the highlights. Covering the whole area in black brown establishes the shadows, then it's just a matter of building up the colours on top from light to dark. The tie was picked out in khaki.

Hopefully, the sequence of photos should give some idea of the process I use for drapery. As the tunic is light in colour I mixed in a fairly small amount of black brown with the stone grey and applied a base coat to the area to be worked on. Them, while that was still wet, I worked in some shadows with the black brown and established the base with pure stone grey. By working wet, soft shadows and transitions can be achieved, though the technique only allows for working on small areas at a time. After that, it's a case of building up the highlights by adding increasing amounts of white to the base colour - at this stage there is no need for working wet.

I tend to put the head on towards the end of this process to check how the overall tones are working out. In this case I found that I needed to lighten the shirt colour to make it stand out more against the neck.

As with the face, the direction of the light has to be remembered - highlights tend to sit on top of the folds and butt up against the darkest areas, creating a crisp lighting effect. I tend to use outlines to define pockets, seams etc, in this case done with a darkened stone grey colour. This also gives a tidier finish.
 
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D

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Finishing off the torso:

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The cross-belt was painted with mixes of red leather and black brown. I worked wet initially for softer shadows, then built up the highlights by adding flat flesh to the red leather (rather than white, in order to keep the warm tones). It was given a coat of Vallejo matt varnish at the end to give it a soft sheen (it doesn't dry matt, needless to say).

The buttons and insignia were first picked out with bronze, then highlights added with old gold, The final stage was the medal ribbon, which was pretty straightforward.

The last part will be painting the pith helmet.
 
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