Mr. Color lacquer paint problem

Jakko

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Are there any car refinishers near you Jakko?
I don’t even know, there may be but I’ve now ordered a bottle of Mr Levelling Thinner so I’ll just wait for that to arrive before trying again (which will probably be a week or more … I ordered a few more bits and the shop then informed me that one of them is out of stock but expected next week sigh).
 

rtfoe

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Hi Jakko,
I have experienced this before. Cellulose thinners from hardware stores come in different formulas with each brand. I've been using cellulose thinners for ages too until recently when they acted up with the very same paint I use. The thinners smell different and they don't evaporate or have that cool feeling when in contact with skin. I suspect the formulas have been changed or I got a watered down batch. It is now relegated to airbrush cleaning.
I use Mr Levelling Thinner for all my Mr Color lacquers now. The previous cellulose and normal Mr Thinners created build up at the nozzle and needle tips and occasional spiders web unless I do a larger ratio of thinner to paint to prevent it from occurring which means more layers to cover.
Try sticking a brush into a semi dried goop of Mr Color and pull away and you will get thin strands of spiderwebs. That's why they're not suitable for brush painting. Airbrushing for that matter they're great. Also you can never throw away dried Mr Color lacquer paints as they can be regurgitated back to life with their thinners.

Cheers,
Richard
 

Jakko

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I've been using cellulose thinners for ages too until recently when they acted up with the very same paint I use. The thinners smell different and they don't evaporate or have that cool feeling when in contact with skin. I suspect the formulas have been changed or I got a watered down batch.
Could well be it was changed to more eco-friendly constituents. For example, one Dutch equivalent to white spirit is called terpentine (that’s not turpentine, BTW, even though the name is similar) and it always worked fine for creating washes from enamel paints. In recent years, though, the formula appears to have been changed and it now takes literally days to evaporate rather than half an hour or so like it used to. On the bottle the name has been changed a little too, to include some words to the effect that it’s “eco” now.
 
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