Small station platform surface material?

Stevekir

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#1
I am modelling a Static Shelf Layout of a small rural station in the GWR, bigger than a halt, dated sometime between the two wars.

From photos posted on this site the platforms sometimes had a stretch of slabs along some of the edge near the tracks, but I am not modelling that - just the surface. I have seen photos on the Internet marked (C) PGH and the surface is indistinct but looks like fine gravel quite well compacted, certainly not tarmac.

What do you think the surface is made of please?

Also, would it be OK for me to post three of the photos without infringing copyright?

Thanks
 
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#4
Hi Steve
At that period you would be looking at paved areas around the buildings, stonework edges to the platform, and gravel on the platform areas further out. This would have lasted until at least the mid fifties.
One thing to be aware of is that white painted lines on the platform edges were not brought in until the blackout started during the Second World War.
Cheers
Tim
 

Stevekir

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#6
Very helpful. Thanks. For the gravel I will experiment with sand sprinkled on to PVA glue, than roughed up a little, then airbrushed with paint to give subtle changes in colour.
 
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#7
Hi Steve
Remember this area would be regularly rolled so will be relatively smooth. Also, at 4mm/foot (assuming you are working in OO scale) the texture would be pretty fine, so it probably needs to be even rather than roughed up. I would use silver sand or even talcum powder as the “grit” and rely on paint, washes, and dry brushing to give interest. You could use Sandtext type paint instead of grit for ease of use, or sandpaper/wet-or-dry paper (as suggested by Mick above) but might find it hard to disguise the joins if you need more than one sheet.
 

stillp

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#8
You can buy abrasive papers in rolls, not just sheets.

Pete
 

Stevekir

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#10
Thanks all. I will first try sand , glued on, and painted including patches here and there. If that doesn't work, I will try the other suggestions.
 

Stevekir

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#11
I have done an experiment by putting PVA glue on to plywood using a sig-sag edged spatula and sprinkling on "golden" sand and then shaking off the surplus (attachment, which is full size).

I used my fingers to press the left hand half down after the surplus was shaken off. The striations (caused by the glue going on in slight waves due to the sig-sag end of the spatula) add some welcome variety to the appearance and this approach is worth pursuing.
 

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