Tiger 1 Toon

Bortig the Viking

SMF Supporter
Joined
Mar 1, 2019
Messages
280
Points
43
First Name
Mark
Hi all, have spent this afternoon putting my Tiger 1 Toon tank together and want to spray it panzer gray not yellow, is this the name or is it something specific, might need to order some as this is my first military vehicle.
Thanks
 

Jakko

SMF Supporter
Joined
Apr 28, 2018
Messages
3,089
Points
113
First Name
Jakko
„Panzer grey” is the common English name for the dark grey colour that German military vehicles were painted in until early 1943. Any model paint that says it’s „Panzer grey” should do.
 

beowulf

hoowozziewee?, wozziweisen?
SMF Supporter
Joined
Jun 13, 2013
Messages
3,877
Points
113
Location
t'norf
First Name
Paul
its called Dunkelgrau i believe.....the modern RAL Classic number is 7021
 

Bortig the Viking

SMF Supporter
Joined
Mar 1, 2019
Messages
280
Points
43
First Name
Mark
Hi all, really enjoyed building the toon up, it's now all ready in sections ready for some paint, it's so good my wife bought two more for me for Christmas, apparently I was quiet in my hobby room. All good in the viking house. One thing i noticed was the wheels, many more on the full size, any ideas why so many wheels were used.
 

Jakko

SMF Supporter
Joined
Apr 28, 2018
Messages
3,089
Points
113
First Name
Jakko
On Tigers? To spread the weight as much as possible and so prevent the tank from sinking into the ground.

The Germans began using this kind of suspension on their halftracks, then adopted it for the heavier tanks (everything designed after the Pz.Kpfw. IV, basically). Nobody else ever used it, though, because its drawbacks outweigh its advantages: mud builds up between the wheels and can cause them to jam, especially if it’s freezing, and maintenance and repairs are a nightmare: on a Tiger I with the original wheel layout, to access one wheel you need to change, you may have to remove up to fourteen others. Count them:

Wu0Gd987d3Pnp4UMBO4TnWnwpPw9B5tgPoW7ugQe0WNIog0e&s.jpg

See which ones you’d need to take off to get at the third wheel from the left on the upper row :smiling3:

By the Tiger II, the Germans had realised this as well and simplified it into two rows of double wheels, which makes maintenance and repairs easier — but you’d still have to take up to five wheels off to get at an inner one.
 

Bortig the Viking

SMF Supporter
Joined
Mar 1, 2019
Messages
280
Points
43
First Name
Mark
On Tigers? To spread the weight as much as possible and so prevent the tank from sinking into the ground.

The Germans began using this kind of suspension on their halftracks, then adopted it for the heavier tanks (everything designed after the Pz.Kpfw. IV, basically). Nobody else ever used it, though, because its drawbacks outweigh its advantages: mud builds up between the wheels and can cause them to jam, especially if it’s freezing, and maintenance and repairs are a nightmare: on a Tiger I with the original wheel layout, to access one wheel you need to change, you may have to remove up to fourteen others. Count them:

View attachment 365343

See which ones you’d need to take off to get at the third wheel from the left on the upper row :smiling3:

By the Tiger II, the Germans had realised this as well and simplified it into two rows of double wheels, which makes maintenance and repairs easier — but you’d still have to take up to five wheels off to get at an inner one.
Thanks for that information.
 
Top