Total beginner needs advise

Townyuk

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I am thinking of taking up scale modelling but do not know we’re to begin as it looks like a total mine field, not sure what model to start with, how much I should be spending, what equipment I need. Don’t want to start on something that will overwhelm or something so basic will feel like a child. Any help and advise would be welcome
 

AlanG

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Firstly welcome to the forum Gary

To be honest the Airfix Starter kits are a good place to erm.... start. Cheap enough to practice on and also can give some great results at the end of it. Your budget is obviously key and i understand not spending too much on something you may not enjoy.

So i'd give them a go and ask as many questions a you want on here. The only silly question is the one you don't ask
 

Tim Marlow

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Welcome aboard mate......
Remember, we all started somewhere, and there are no daft questions....
Alan has given good advice there, the only other thing I would add is to pick a kit of something you actually want to make. Don’t go with something just because it’s cheap or it’s a “practice”. You will always put in that little bit extra if it’s a subject you like....
 

Townyuk

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Hi AlanG sorry for my ignorance but I’ve always associated airfix to models when I was a kid, are the starter kits aimed more at adults?
 

Jakko

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Start simple: think about what kind of thing you want to make a model of, and ask (here on this forum, for example, or in a local model shop, if you’re lucky enough to live near one) if there are any kits of it that are suitable for beginners.

Apart from a kit, all you really need are a decent hobby knife and model cement — sure, there are tons of other tools, but you don’t actually need most or any of them, certainly not if you’re not sure this is the hobby for you. As for the knife, I would recommend this type:



and not this:



mainly because the first is easier to handle. Both types, though, are cheap to buy so don’t skimp on them. A good hobby knife is the Number One modeller’s tool :smiling3:
 

Jim & Samson

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Hi Gary,
Welcome to the forum, where most people start modelling is where their interest lies eg. cars, boats, planes or tanks, then the scale you want to build this is very dependant on how much space you've got to display them, once you've worked this out ( and it's not definative ) then ask as many questions you want, there are no stupid questions only stupid answers.
My advise is start small and grow with each project.
regards Jim
 

Townyuk

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Thanks Jim, is there any certain manufactures that are tried and trusted
Thanks
 

Jason Crausby

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I would say, just give it a try...you can pick up models online and starter kits tend to come with paints, brushes and cement and you can always add from there... what types of things are you interested in... aircraft?..armour?..other vehicles? Figures or even busts.... I started as a child on planes and now mainly do figures and busts but it whatever you enjoy at the end of the day!
Jason
 

Gern

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The guys have pointed you in the right direction Gary. If you don't have access to a modelling shop, it might be worthwhile looking at the 'toy model kits' on ebay (their words, not mine). Even if you don't find anything you fancy immediately, it will give you some idea of the sheer variety of kits there are available along with some idea of what the costs are likely to be.

Generally, the more you spend on a kit, the more detailed and accurate it is likely to be - although there are exceptions - and the easier it will be to build as the mould quality is likely to be better. If you see something you like, have a root about and see if you can find any reviews or build articles for that particular kit on the 'net. They will give you valuable information; and there's always the guys on here who can muster up huge quantities of advice and information on all aspects of modelling - and are always willing to help.
 

Ian M

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All good advice so far. I would just add this. The paint and brush in the Airfix starter kits are not the best paint to start with. They can give a good result but I would recommend investing in some others. There are as many different opinions to which paints as there are makes of paint. With out getting technical there are either oil base - Enamel paints, or water base - Acrylics. Both give a great finish when applied with a good brush. There is a heap of good advice in the paint section on here.
As Jakko wrote, a good hobby knife is a very good idea. Also some wet and dry "sand paper" to smooth any lumps and bumps. Failing that ladies fingernail shaping boards are a good alternative.
 

Tom Rigg

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When you've found a kit on t'internet you like the look of, try and find some reviews/build reviews to read.
Here's a couple but there are loads more - including this site.
But don't think their weathering method (if any) is a must. Some products although making a modelers life easier can be pretty expensive and there are other ways. It'll all come together in time but concentrate on the basics in the beginning.
Happy Modeling
Tom
 

Jakko

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boatman

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Hi Gary an a welcome from me as well so what you gonna do( eg planes or ships or tanks or other ? ) that's if you made up your mind that is ?
chris
 

Mr Bowcat

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Hi Gary,

This may or may not help, but when I started out I went to Hobbycraft, spent some time looking at the kits (they have quite a few) and picked one that interested me. I opened the box to get at the instructions and added the paints called out, along with some thinner, brushes and glue.

Admittedly Hobbycraft aren't the cheapest (I don't think I've bought a kit from there since), but they have a good selection plus all the other bits you will need.

Cheers,

B
 

Jim R

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Hi Gary
Welcome to the forum. I am sure you will enjoy your time here.
Lots of sound ideas already. So many kits to choose from. To start with stick to something simple.
What equipment do you need - notice I said need. You need some basic, good quality stuff to use to make your model. Without it you will be frustrated and you won't be able to do what is needed. This is my idea of a basic modelling kit.

329534

Cutting mat - best to work on. The squared lines help you to fit parts together squarely. Also stops ruining the dining table :tongue-out3:
Snippers or sprue cutters - get the best you can afford. Used to cut the parts cleanly from the plastic 'tree' they come on. Don't twist off the parts - you'll ruin them.
A knife - I like a Swann-Morton scalpel with a No11 blade for general work. The blades are cheap so you can change them regularly to ensure you always work with a decent blade.
Sanding sticks - different sizes, shape and grades are useful.
Tweezers - you'll not handle tiny parts without them. Buy a decent pair as cheap ones have points that don't meet properly and will drive you mad.
Cement - difficult one this. I like a thin cement which I apply with a cheap, fine paint brush.
Paint brushes - reasonably good ones. Flat and pointed.
Paint - For brush painting I like Vallejo Modelcolor. It is thinned with water and gives a nice matt finish. Don't expect to cover with one thick coat. Use two or more thin coats. You will get a better finish and not obscure detail.

That is just my thoughts. Every modeller has their own ideas. The main thing is HAVE FUN - it's a hobby after all.
Jim
 
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zuludog

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The problem is, as I'm sure you'll appreciate, that we can't teach you everything all at once, and sooner or later you'll just have to start on something.
So here are my general suggestions -

Start buying a general magazine like Airfix Model World or specifically on aircraft or military vehicles, they are the two most popular fields. Just go to a newsagent - W H Smiths is the obvious choice - and see what you like. Though the Airfix mag is sold in Sainsbury's, I don't know about other supermarkets
As you read you will see how things are done, and pick up tips, techniques, & ideas

Similarly Search YouTube for 'plastic modelling' there will be videos for beginners, or specific areas. Make a start and just keep following the suggestions

Airfix beginners kits might not be the best, but you've gotta start somewhere

As I've posted in other threads,
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do a general modelling set of brushes for about £12 or see what else they have

Knives. - I like scalpels. #3 handle is smaller than #4

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have taster sets with one #3 or #4 handle and one of each type of blade for a reasonable price, so you can see what you like and order from there

The most common type of blades are 10, 10A & 11 for size 3 handle or size 18 or 19 and 25 for size 4 handle
Otherwise just search their website to see what's available
 
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